Tesla Letter To Gernsbeck

Date: 
Wednesday, December 1, 1915
Volume: 
21
Pages: 
382-382
Archived Page: 
Author: 
Subject: 

382 to the thousands of amateur radio siations scattered broad- cast through the en.ire length and breadth of this fair land. There is hardly a hnnilst to- ‘ day which dos not boast of several ama eur wireless sta- tions, and their number is in- creasing by many hundreds each day. As the European 'war has so thoroughly demonstrated quick transmission of in- telligence is of para- mouniimportance, Tel- egraph and telxphone linesare putouiof ortlcr wilh riilic- / ulously small effort by ` 'B f e 1 ` ~ ..: uf" .- ` _vs_ W2 11° _ .1 t ` - \.'f `_. i %\*°'\ ‘I ._ ::-~~°-;;..--;. ~‘ ,~ - .v ._ ._ , ,\v= 1-»,.-,v \‘t r .ie 1 ~ . " _ ~ ,.-»f-.¢“‘»»' ' -fe , - ‘_,.'.1»\f§`.»;‘q'Q`.:_t»' ‘ \v*u ,,,° ,iv ,<',¢\- .~"-_.-;,, .t t- ... s t-" °"`l"”?»“‘° ~“ . " - ° 1 ` t ” s ‘ "tv `§_,. N.. ® _ ‘ig _ i Q 9 #ff ! , P’ \_/ Nlkoln Tex|u'a Acceptance ls Htmornry Member In the Radio Lelglle Amerlcn. -.1111 _ »» .:,..'; _ THE ELECTRICAL EXPERIMENTER »>‘='¢ . ¢|1!Pt_li|ll£FIA||Gl|S£|ESCilllE$ rttésiuiiauts " " “Q ll §;5;__ :::g::;_;::..e .. .. .§_3_::_g;....., T; 7*i.q?§r.... n. 1.11..1.1 ussiae 11 ....1.1.»¢ ~1. 1-111:sc11 frtscnlrn :nut -ak-1 1. f 411- un .-4111... ,11.1=¢ .. 1.1 nn kms ma 11¢1.1u¢¢ ..4 1.1.-4 1. an in mis 14 iivuro ~1 1.1 .ccm »a»<11-1.~i 111~s111s~<1» 11 num niwi ar mme ui 111ns1 ._ ._.. ._ LT‘........""". :': :_f:.:‘ ` lf' = `~ .5 _.__... _ . _.___ - »:._. _ December, 1915 The Duty of the Amateur. I7 Uncle Sam grants the amateur 'Eze free use " of the ether it is cer- tainly up to tile ama- teur to give something in return for the privi ege. It was with tlzis tiought \\pper- ost i|\ ` rf'1d that , Gernsback in _]uly, 1915, hrst cnnc.ived tie i ,ea of organ- - izing the Radio League of [\inerica. l1y referring to the 191.3 tiovernmlnt book. Rodin ` _ Slalinus of Hu' tjinlvd . n .v ' J sc ~i\ 1. I nu y 1 'unit s ' a v ‘~ ~ been Q Fw. '°€-'Z¥°~ \ ,,,_‘_. -1 ~1 » ~~».; t. 4, ._ _ B “_ ~111 1 in ' »». "M -- ' . I ,, `&' ; t , ln, ' '-1, . 1 \“ "~i_ ' ~,,_” 1. L. "~1 "' MW 1 """ ~. ` fra 11 , ~ 1 M Mt," ei., ¢~.,, » , - '11, , lo .4 _ ».,_,I 111. '-e ~. _ "“'| 1 . “il =. _ I 1* \ \=é_, ago ‘ Prulessnr Rtlllnlld A. Feas- enden’s Accwtance n Honorary Member In the 11111110 League 11| Amu- “ l . 101 _ 9 Q 1' ,\~ _x t. l 1 e ( F ,e E’ Q' in lns I Mr //” ° ` ` / .1 W ` @ tt 1 16 Q 5/ t it \\ill he /, V' t tl 1 1 / , Q I 1’ ur / \ h e ““ /Z / J., K ’ F; "~` ~ " .,__ \ ' 1* '-.1`°' , -." 1 ` , ; 11 ax A ` Q "~1.,,_( 1 J °'~'=. '”' t $ 1 :‘;,» ‘“ 'uh ' - _, _._ 1: K. ri . ....,, _“_ .ww / tw v \` 1 BN t A m 1... um s. . J' fa. nc; 01. pn" E sl' a" P 1 to \- v°\>\‘ f ."` 2»‘.\“1\, '> ”-.. ._ ""~» °¢1.. ` `,,§.,\’ ¢ uf " w \' _t the “_ ’ |,., ' 1, H,” ° ¢_:_ 5 ~ \ .1 . _,. .0 \ ‘_ =.,, M _ . -~ ,H »,~¢ wi 'K it it’ W1-° \, ° ~., ‘ »._, "Q "‘ ' ,¢ ‘ ‘t _,sd - M, 'ar /il ‘ ez” ‘fi » ‘ f '° *“ . ; .-Q »f .t-" v w "1 11 ` pw. . .‘ “ ,.mw“_, ,g / ax .., 9 ¢Jo v,,f»f‘ "it _, E? ‘QQ 11 c ¢ \ 1 - ‘wt .gf ,i N( Q” ff / as ' i 6 9 f, / / v \ ‘-= * p Q Q »1 \ 9 \ I lin ‘ . \ o . 1 . / \ 'P J’ \ I , s 11| /’\ | enemy and whole sections o_f country are thereby isolated. Such sections are then helpless and no in1portant_mess:i'es can be safely transmitted in either direction. All this helps the enemy enormously, and the thus isolated section is then entirely at his mercy. If France or Belgium had pos- sessed an eflective amateur wireless scout service there might possibly be a dillcrellt story to tell to-day. In these days of fast military movements, quick reporting nf war intelligence is of incalculahle importance, and if this is true of Europe, it is even truer in the United States, the country of such vast and undefended coast lines, One needs not be a dreamer in order to appreciate how easily a hostile fleet could approach our long, badly patroled coasts and try a landing of an armed force. There might not be a telegraph or telephone line around for miles, or if it ditl exist. it is certain that spies operating on land would have found little trouble in putting it out of commission beforehand. But there will be a lone radio amateur on the alert who has seen the approaching Heet and within 30 seconds Washington will have the priceless intelligence. Vice versa, there might be a handful of poorly equipped United States militia holding the enemy at /n111v¢= nr. Lee at |f1111=1t'1_A¢¢¢pt11111¢¢ 11, n1111111.fy m¢111|11¢1» |11 the ma." League as Amerie.. bay temporarily. It is conceivable that this small body of men might have neither scn.l- ing nor receiving radio apparatus. Some- where back of the hills the United States regulars are coning to the rescue nf the sorely pressed militia men. They want the latter to l1..l.l out for a few short hours and v/aut to tell them of their coming. The radio message containing this intelligence is tlashed over the hills, but is not rece5ved by the exhausted men. However, just as all hope is given up, a lad of 17 years with streaming hair rtins up to the major of the small band and hreathlessly conveys the cheering news to him. He caught the mes~ sage over his pitiful 30-foot aerial on top of his harn, ibut it saved the day, lrle did not even have a sending station. His out- ht comprised only a cheap home-made re< ceiving “set"! But it did the work, just the same. Such occasions are almost certain to arise in the future, and it is thus of the utmost importance tl~at every patriotic radio amateur should offer his station to his country. cn. licensed since 1913. The reason lnr this surprisingly small registration is found in the fact that the la\v dues not require re- ceiving stations to bc licensed, not small sending stations located in the interior ot large States, where the effect of a weak spark coil would not extend over the State borders. Such stations are exceedingly numerous and have heen estimated to run above 300,000. Now, then, there appears no reason for doubt that sooner or later the Government would pass a new law requir~ ing the registration and licensing of such stations in order to have such stations available in case of national stress. No one can foretell what surprises sueli a new law will bring the amateurs, and for that reason it cannot be denied that it is far better and more patriotic to give this necessary information voluntarily to the Government, instead of waiting till a new law is passed which might perhaps be detri- mental from the viewpoint of the amateur. The League’s Charter. HE Radio League ol America was organiz.d at New York under the laws of the State of New York in October, 1915. its charter follows:

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